BIOGRAPHY

CURRICULUM VITAE

VISUAL EFFECTS

FILM DIRECTORS

MIKE CONNOR

ALBERTO PARODI

ALESSIO FOCARDI

GUIDO PAPPADA'

PARTNERS MOBILE LAB

PAGES RELATED TO

PAGES RELATED TO

davidbush.org       

PRESS - ARTICLES - INTERVIEWS - PHOTO CREDITS

An illustrious figure from the world of Italian cinema who, although not born in Italy, loves our country very much, illustrates some of his interesting ideas for stimulating and revitalizing our audiovisual production.

SOME SIMPLE  PROPOSALS    by David Bush


written for the magazine MILLECANALI for September 2007 edition


INTEGRATING VFX INTO ON-SET REVIEWS

By Chris Chinnock, executive director, 8K Association


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Until recently, the addition of visual effects (VFX) to a movie or TV production was done in a time-consuming post-production process. This meant actors had to imagine the final look while performing in front of a blue or green screen. With the advent of tracked cameras and LEDs screens, content creators are able to pre-render complex background plates and special effects to capture live actors and special effects in camera. This is a big benefit as it allows for instant review of the shot so creatives can decide if it acceptable or needs a reshoot right away.

But what if your budget does not allow for renting a sound stage with a huge LED video wall and tracked camera/game engine solution? To find out, we spoke with David Bush, a film professional with 40 years of on-set and post-production experience. His team has developed what he calls an 8K Mobile Lab.

Live Television interview by Mauro Roffi in Milan, on the occasion of Millecanale's 40th. anniversary.

THIS FROM YOUTUBE

12K & FUTUREPROOFING  -  A note from Cinematographer – Mike Connor

Image illustrating the scope of the camera science technology formats.

Photo credits and thank you's for images

BLUE SCREENS & SHAKESPEARE   by David Bush


written in 2009


...A conscientious visual effects supervisor would, in the face of the sum of these issues, ask themselves whether this could be considered a “to be or nor to be” situation, in the sense of whether it is wise to actually use a blue or green screen at all, or could it have been more efficient to have shot on the actual background and subsequently rotoscoped the foreground persons out...

           or not


...I’m not joking, as I was once standing on the backlot of Cinecittà Studios in Rome in the small and shaky confines of a two person so-called "cherry picker", some 40 meters above ground with director Giuseppe Tornatore - he wanted to evaluate with his director's viewfinder what a shot from a mini helicopter would look like on an extravagantly high set that had been built there for a commercial (and conventions and events). I told him that I suffered from heights, and he turned to me and said   “Just think that you’re watching a film, and then you won’t suffer”...